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Sneaker peak: the Louis

Boy's club

International best-sellers are not made, they are born. Such is the case with the iconic Louis sneaker.
Featuring Christian Louboutin’s signature red soles and named after one of the designer’s dear friends, the sleek, trademark silhouette made its international debut as part of the House’s first men’s collection in 2009.
Ever since international pop star Mika danced on stage in a pair of Louis Spikes, it was clear the Louis was destined for stardom.
The versatile, haute streetwear inspired sneaker proved to be a slam dunk with pro-athletes and rock stars alike. Just ask Louis lovers, Tony Parker or Pharrell Williams.
However, it wasn’t court-side or even backstage that the Louis was born. Like so many brilliant ideas, this one arrived when Christian Louboutin stopped to smell the flowers…

The Louis was inspired by a promenade through a classical French garden that I took with a friend of mine who is one of the greatest landscape designers I have ever met, Louis. It had to be very simple, casual, and timeless.

Christian Louboutin

A garden of wearable delights

To sport, or to chic? Before the debut of this legendary sneaker, that had always been the question.
With the Louis, you don’t have to choose between comfort and cool. What began as a seed of inspiration that was planted during a fortuitous walk through nature blossomed into a veritable garden of iterations.
The Louis library boasts nearly 1,000 trend-forward and essential looks, including some 200 versions of Louis’ beloved younger brother, the low-top Louis Junior.
Fluorescent python? Check. Vichy, flannel, and tartan fabrics? Mais oui!
Classic black calf skin? Bien sûr, monsieur. Louis knows how to make a grand entrance and a discrete “French exit.”